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Bobby Womack diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease

By Staff, wire reports

NEW YORK -- Bobby Womack has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.

The 68-year-old Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member with ties to West Virginia told the BBC in a recent interview the diagnosis came after he began having difficulty remembering his songs and the names of people he's worked with.

The soul singer has cut a wide path through the music business as a performer and songwriter in his 50-year career and recently launched another act with "The Bravest Man in the Universe,'' the Damon Albarn-produced comeback album that recently made several best-of lists.

In August 2011, Womack and his brothers were inducted into the West Virginia All Black Schools Sports and Academic Hall of Fame. He and his brothers made up The Womack Brothers and, later, The Valentinos. Womack wrote and the brothers originally recorded The Rolling Stones' first U.K. No. 1 hit, "It's All Over Now" and New Birth's "I Can Understand It."

As a singer, Womack is most notable for the hits "Lookin' For a Love," "That's The Way I Feel About Cha," "Woman's Gotta Have It," "Harry Hippie," "Across 110th Street" and his 1980s hit, "If You Think You're Lonely Now."

He also was Sam Cooke's backing guitarist.

Womack was born in Cleveland, but his mother is from Bluefield and his father is from Charleston. He said his brothers were born in West Virginia before his parents moved to Ohio.

Alzheimer's is a degenerative brain disease characterized by memory loss. It's the latest health problem for the 68-year-old singer, who's also been fighting cancer and other maladies.


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