Get Connected
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • Sign In
  • Classifieds
  • Sections
Print

Reporting: A stressful profession

While my job may not be as stressful as, say, a Kroger worker on the first night of a major water system contamination episode, it has its tensions.

In fact, last week the job-hunting website CareerCast.com ranked being a newspaper reporter among the nation's 10 most stressful occupations, acing out police officers, among other professions.

  The least stressful job ranking went to audiologists, who bring in an average median salary of about $70,000 per year, and have a projected job growth rate of 37 percentage points.

I hear that!

By contrast, the average median salary for newspaper reporters was listed at $35,870, with a projected growth rate of minus 6 percent. VCR repairmen likely have a brighter employment outlook.

Job factors leading to a high stress rating, according to the CareerCast survey, included low growth potential, job-related travel, deadlines, competitiveness, working in the public eye and meeting the public -- you know, pretty much everything involved in being a bush league reporter.

Topping the most stressful occupation list was enlisted military personnel, the most obvious job category for the No. 1 spot. Among other jobs making the Top 10 cut were taxi driver, firefighter, airline pilot, event coordinator, corporate executive and public relations executive.  Newspaper reporters had the lowest job growth outlook and the third-lowest salaries.

Placing just below audiologists on CareerCast's least stressful occupation list were hair stylists. Perhaps the two laid-back trades could be merged in dealing with men of my certain age -- when an abundance of ear hair becomes problematical.

Other jobs making the Top Ten least stressful list included jewelers, tenured university professors, tailors, dietitians, medical records technicians, librarians and drill press operators.

 Despite the stress level involved in my chosen profession -- chosen because it seemed to be the only position open to a political science major at the time -- I would not switch places with an audiologist for all the golden wax in the average hair stylist's auditory canal.

Getting a major scoop, winning prizes or getting a job on a major league paper at this stage of my career are getting to be dicey propositions.

For a person who doesn't have much of a life, it gives me great pleasure to spend much of it writing about yours!

 

 


Print

User Comments