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Letters: Jan. 24, 2014, Christianity, natural resources, unions

Turn from Christianity is a bad choice

Editor:

As I was gathering documents for my upcoming driver's license renewal, I noticed inscribed near the bottom my birth certificate the words "Remember Thy Creator in the days of thy youth", Ecclesiastes 12:1. I couldn't help but think how far this nation as a people has strayed from that form of teaching.

Our country has nearly reached a point of no return in consideration of God's Word and His laws. Psalm 9:17 says that "the wicked shall be turned into hell and ALL nations that forget God." For decades, collective measures have been taken to eliminate God and His commands from our schools, our legislative bodies and from the very minds of our children. It is not politically correct to disdain sin or to talk about God, we are told. We are infringing upon the civil rights of others if we try to publicly teach the truth about God's Creation.

Psalm 14:1 says that "The fool has said in his heart, there is no God". The great Apostle Paul's inspired letter to the Romans very aptly describes the corruption of the people and the consequences of sin. He goes on to say, "There is no fear of God before their eyes" (Romans 3:17). If that does not accurately describe society today, I wouldn't know what other phrase to use to define its degradation.

There has been much public controversy lately about the similarities of the collapse of the Roman Empire and the condition of America, and if such a collapse could happen here in our own country. We are only fooling ourselves if we believe that we are too great to fall. If we really are concerned about the state of this country and its preservation, we will unite to first restore its moral principles and turn back to what we know to be right in God's sight.

Sheila Derreberry

St. Albans

Crisis should alert us to protect resources

Editor:

There are many arguments these days between groups that are pro-industry or pro-environment. Amid the exchanges of contradictory facts on the economy and pollution, a basic fact is often overlooked. This fact is so obvious that it seems absurd to ignore it.

The fact is that humans cannot survive without access to safe water. No money can buy it or produce it after it becomes toxic.

West Virginia is home to some of the nation's most pristine watersheds. It is also home to the practice of mountaintop-removal mining, concentrated chemical industry and now hydrofracking for natural gas.

It is my sincere hope that the state-of-emergency water ban in eight counties will cause citizens and elected representatives to wake up and recognize that water is a precious resource and requires serious protection.

Let us urge our elected officials to cease demonizing the EPA, cease their shortsighted support of polluting industries, and instead create a viable economy for West Virginia in which citizens are not forced to forsake health for employment.

It is time for CEOs and politicians to realize that their decisions regarding the protection of our water sources will lead to the demise of health for their own children and grandchildren. Is that really worth the money?

Citizens can no longer rely on industry to "educate" them about hydrofracking. We must educate ourselves.

Carli Mareneck

Sweet Springs

Unions made middle class, can help keep it

Editor:

Because of unions, workers have fair living wages, safe working conditions, vacations, holidays, sick days, the 40-hour workweek and overtime pay. There is maternity leave for women, health benefits, retirement benefits and so much more.

I have been a union member and I have been a manager, foreman, director and a business owner. I know that we all owe it to the Union for the good working conditions we have today. The workers pay taxes and buy goods, which keeps America functioning. Unions are what made the middle class.

Congress should raise the minimum wage. Because of corporate greed, wages could be even lower today for workers if they don't walk out and say enough is enough. Work on infrastructure, highways, bridges, water and sewage projects is needed now. Congress should pass the jobs bill. We must unionize to give our workers a living wage. America needs to rebuild its status in the world as a country that cares about its people. The union is the one to do it.

Archie Chestnut

Charleston


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