Get Connected
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • Sign In
  • Classifieds
  • Sections
Print

Construction begins on stalled Oakwood CVS store

By Caitlin Cook, Staff writer

A long-standing plan to build a drugstore just off Corridor G is finally coming to fruition.

Hometown Development begins construction on a new CVS store this month after various delays, including a legal dispute with nearby landowners in 2012 stemming from right-of-way concerns for the store’s entrance.

The store will be 13,225 square feet, with 70 parking spaces on a 0.9-acre slice of land at the intersection of Oakwood Road, Oakhurst Drive and Mullins Road as previously planned.

“We look forward to opening our third Charleston location in order to continue providing the community with convenient and accessible pharmacy services,” Michael DeAngelis, a CVS spokesman, said.

The new store is currently set to open in November.

Jeff Albrecht of Hometown Development has been in charge of designing the project. Albrecht has built more than 30 CVS stores throughout West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Pennsylvania and Maryland.

A Walgreens was first proposed at the site in January 2008. The historically residential nature of the area and small track of land caused problems for city planners in the past.

That project came to a halt and CVS came into play, announcing plans to build.

City Planing Director Dan Vriendt told the Gazette in 2011 the two plans had similar layouts. He added the lot was a bit unusual with three front streets — Oakwood, Oakhurst and Mullins.

The plan called for two parking lots on either side of the store.

In 2012, the Municipal Planning Commission tabled the issue after Albrecht requested a right of way at the left of the proposed store site be replaced with a shorter right of way farther west along Mullins Road. The access passed through two privately owned land parcels.

City officials could not be reached for comment. Offices were closed Friday in observation of West Virginia Day.

Albrecht did not return calls for comment Friday.

“It is always exciting to see new businesses locating in areas of our city, especially businesses who are willing to make large initial investments like a brand new store,” said city councilman Courtney Persinger, who represents that district. “That tract of land has been residential as long as I can remember, which is fine, but residential land that close to downtown is always going to be considered for commercial use.”

Persinger added Charleston has a lot of drugstores but as the local population ages, the need for them in more communities increases.

Reach Caitlin Cook at caitlin.cook@wvgazette.com or 304-348-5113.


Print

User Comments