www.wvgazette.com http://www.wvgazette.com Gazette archive feed en-us Copyright 2015, Charleston Newspapers, Charleston, WV Newspapers Funerals for: January 01, 2015 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT01/301019975 OBIT01 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT01/301019975 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:02:40 -0500 Allman, Franklin D. 11 a.m., Rose and Quesenberry Peace Chapel, Beckley.


Barnhart, Virginia M. Noon, Roush Funeral Home, Ravenswood.


Eagle, Marsha K. Noon, Pennington Funeral Home, Gauley Bridge.


Mahan, Lucille 1 p.m., Casto Funeral Home Chapel, Ravenswood.


Payne, Barbara F. 1 p.m., Curry Funeral Home, Alum Creek.

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James Bush http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019984 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019984 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:02:34 -0500 James Bush, the seventh child of the late Bishop Louis Bush Sr. and Aldora Moore Bush, born May 1, 1928 in Charleston, West Virginia. He was preceded in death by his parents; sisters, Leola Bush Moore, Lorenthia Bush Hicks, Mattie Bush and Carrie Bush Hall; and brothers, Reuben Bush, Harvey Bush, Louis Bush Jr., Homer Bush and Robert Bush. On December 23, 2014, God called James home.

James was educated in the public schools of Kanawha County, graduating from Garnet High School in 1947. He then pursued a career as a skilled brick mason, retiring in 1980 with 32 years of service.

James married his childhood sweetheart, Helen Davis, in 1948. James and Helen had a wonderful life together until God called her home 1964.

James leaves to cherish his memory: brother, Bishop Howard Bush of Fort Mill, SC; sisters-in-law, Emma Bush and Elder Freda Davis, both of Charleston, WV, and Janet Davis of Cleveland, OH; brother-in-law, Bishop Robert Davis Sr. (Doris) of Columbia, MD; 37 nieces and nephews; numerous great-nieces and -nephews; and a host of cousins, relatives and friends. He will be greatly missed by his loving and faithful caregivers: nieces, Ester Farrow and Reginia Lipscomb, and nephew, Clark Bush.

Service will be held at noon Saturday, January 3, 2015 at God in Christ Glorious Church, Wertz Ave., Charleston. Friends may call one hour prior to the service at the church.

Preston Funeral Home, Charleston, is in charge of arrangements.

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Anita Lynn Collins http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019987 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019987 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:02:31 -0500 Anita Lynn Collins, 49, of Cedar Grove, passed away Dec. 20, 2014 following a short illness.

She was a homemaker.

She was preceded in death by her father, Phillip Shaver.

Surviving are her son, Matthew Collins of Glasgow; daughter, Kelsey Johnson of Cedar Grove; her pride and joy, her grandson, Cole Holcomb; mother, Norma Lee Withrow Shaver of Navarre, Ohio; sisters, Elizabeth Yeager of Belle, Pamella Williams of Mobile, Ala., Sabrina Norris of Navarre and Lana Goodson of Shrewsbury; and brother, Randy Shaver of Lubbock, Texas.

A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 3, at Fidler and Frame Funeral Home, Belle, with Pastor Charles Bolen officiating.

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Armetta Collins http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019988 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019988 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:02:30 -0500 Mrs. Armetta Jasper Collins, 89, formerly of Mount Hope, died Dec. 24, 2014. Service will be 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 3, at Shiloh Baptist Church, Blackstone, Va., with visitation beginning one hour prior. Arrangements by Hawkes Funeral Home, Blackstone, Va. Submitted by Ritchie & Johnson Funeral Parlor, Beckley.

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Rose B. Corey http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019998 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019998 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:02:21 -0500 Rose B. Corey, 99, of Charleston, passed away Sunday, Dec. 28, 2014 at her home, surrounded by her loving family. She was born May 22, 1915 in Zahle, Lebanon.

She was preceded in death by her husband, Lee N. Corey Sr., and her son, George N. Corey of Columbus, Ohio.

She is survived by her daughters, Deanne Corey Wymer of Bradenton, Fla., and Rose "Cris" Corey Van Hoff of Charleston; her son, Lee N. Corey Jr., also of Charleston; and daughter-in-law, Georgeann Corey of Columbus, Ohio. Her grandchildren include David Wymer (Lisa) and their children, Joseph and Kristie, of Bradenton, Fla.; William Wymer (Patricia) and their children, Alex and Tatum, of Tampa, Fla.; Steven Wymer (Marti) and their children, Mason and Michael, of Park City, Utah; Jennifer Van Hoff Childress (Scott) and their children, Katie and Jack, of Marietta, Ga.; Dr. Amy Van Hoff Gillian (Jason) and their children, Lois and Oliver, of Durham, N.C.; Dr. Corey Van Hoff (Karen) of Columbus, Ohio; Almitra Corey of Los Angeles, Calif.; and Michael Corey of Columbus, Ohio.

Mrs. Corey emigrated to the United States with her husband, Lee, from Jib Janine, Lebanon, in 1939 and they settled in Charleston, where he was in the grocery business with his two brothers, Sam and George Corey, before opening their own grocery store on Fourth Avenue, and it was here where they started their family and their long, happy lives together until his death in 1956. After retiring from the grocery business, Rose kept busy with volunteer work at St. Francis Hospital, her work at St. Anthony Church and their famous fish dinners during Lent, helping her son, Lee, at his Players Club Restaurant and enjoying her grandchildren.

Funeral service will be 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 3, at St. Anthony Catholic Church, Charleston, with the Rev. David Wuletich officiating. Burial will follow in Sunset Memorial Park, South Charleston.

Friends may call from 11 a.m. until service time Saturday at the church.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations in her memory to St. Anthony Catholic Church, 1000 W. Sixth St., Charleston, WV 25302.

Bartlett Burdette Cox Funeral Home, 513 Tennessee Ave., Charleston, WV 25302, is serving the Corey family.

Online condolences may be sent to the Corey family by visiting www.bartlettburdettecox.com.

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Lloyd R. Friend http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019995 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019995 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:02:23 -0500 Lloyd R. Friend, 87, of St. Albans, was called to his Heavenly home on Dec. 29, 2014 surrounded by family who loved him.

He was born July 15, 1927 in Clay.

Lloyd was preceded in death by his parents, Robert and Eva Friend; his sisters, Norma Marion and Edna Bell Scott; and his brothers, Hubert, Howard and Lee Friend. He was also preceded in death by his wife, Elsie Friend, whom he loved dearly; his daughter, Barbara Lacy; and his grandson, Robbie Friend.

Lloyd loved his family. He loved the outdoors, hunting and gardening at his home place in Clay. He loved playing jokes on family and friends and he loved to laugh. He was a man of integrity.

Lloyd loved the Lord. He attended Bethany Baptist Church, St. Albans, when he was able. He was a loving husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather and friend who will be missed by all who knew him.

He is survived by his son, Richard Friend and his wife, Linda, of St Albans; five grandchildren, Matthew Friend of Louisville, Ky., Sarah Yost of Lock Haven, Pa., Jessica Griffith of Sod, Angi Reynolds of Charleston and Seth Lacy of Hurricane; seven great-grandchildren; and brothers, Jack Friend of Charleston and Garrie Friend of Huntingtown, Md.

A celebration of Lloyd's life will be 1 p.m. Friday, Jan. 2, at Casdorph & Curry Funeral Home, 110 B St., St. Albans, with Pastor Matt Friend and Pastor Timothy Campbell officiating. Burial will follow in Cunningham Memorial Park, St. Albans.

There will be a gathering of family and friends from 11 a.m. until time of service Friday at the funeral home.

The family wishes to thank all of the nurses in Hallway North for your love and care for Lloyd.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Hubbard Hospice House, 1001 Curtis Price Way, Charleston, WV 25311.

Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.casdorphandcurry.com.

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Franklin D. Given http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019977 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019977 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:02:39 -0500 Franklin Delano Given, 72, of Procious, went home to be with the Lord on Tuesday, Dec. 30, 2014 after having a heart attack while deer hunting at home.

He was preceded in death by his wife, Dorma (Casto) Given; parents, Arnold and Blanche Given; brother, Donald Given; and nephews, Kennith Given and Ralph Good.

He was retired from the Mattress Warehouse in Cross Lanes.

Frank was a member of Hilltop Baptist Church, where he attended faithfully. During his life he enjoyed hunting squirrels, deer and crows. He was a member of Clay County's FFA (Future Farmers of America) and was a dedicated gardener.

He is survived by his brother, Ronald (Liz) Given of Ohio; sisters, Elaine (Jim) Lennox of Procious and Barbara (Given) Richards of Summersville; and many nieces and nephews. He was Uncle Frank to everyone who knew him.

Funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 3, at Wilson-Shamblin-Smith Funeral Home, Clay, with the Rev. Nile Fisher officiating the service. Burial will be at Long Sam Samples Cemetery, Procious.

Friends may call from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 2, at the funeral home.

The family wants to thank the Clay County Volunteer Fire Department, State Police and many others to help in our search for Frank.

Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.carlwilsonfuneralhome.com.

Wilson-Shamblin-Smith Funeral Home is honored to be serving the Given family.

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Donald Ray Godbey http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019993 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019993 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:02:25 -0500 On Dec. 29, 2014, Donald Ray Godbey, 72, of Elkview, celebrated his homecoming surrounded by family. Born March 3, 1942, Don was the son of Louise Godbey and the late Roy Godbey Jr. In addition to his father, Don was preceded in death by his sister, Cynthia Lucas; infant nephew, Brian; and grandparents, Roy and Dovie Mae Godbey and Ed and Bessie Saunders.

Don is survived by his loving wife of 53 years, Bonnie Robertson Godbey; sons, Christopher (Tammy) Godbey of Simsbury, Conn., and Michael (Samantha) Godbey of Conyers, Ga.; and mother, Louise Godbey of Charleston. Don also leaves behind two beautiful granddaughters, Sarah and Paige Godbey of Simsbury, Conn., who were the delight of his life. Also surviving are brother, John (Diane) Godbey of Blue Creek; sister, Judy Reed (Al) Breaux of Hurricane; sisters-in-law, Linda Jo (Bruce) Gentry of South Charleston and Barbara (Jim) Edwards of Elkview; and many loving nephews, nieces, cousins and good friends.

He was a 1960 graduate of Elkview High School. Don began working for Royal Typewriter shortly after graduating high school and continued working in that business for 33 years, relocating several times before retiring from Konica in Hartford, Conn., in 1995. After moving back to West Virginia in 1996, Don worked for 10 years for the West Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles.

Don attended Elkview Baptist Church. In recent years he enjoyed studying and researching the Bible, listening to his favorite gospel groups and attending Bible study groups.

Don served in the U.S. Air National Guard for 20 years.

A funeral service to celebrate Don's life will be 2 p.m. Friday, Jan. 2, at Hafer Funeral Home with Pastor Charles Bias officiating and Doug Edens presenting the eulogy. Burial will follow at Elk Hills Memorial Park, Big Chimney, with military graveside rites conducted by American Legion Post 61, Clendenin.

Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 1, at the funeral home.

The family is thankful and appreciative of the care and compassion shown to Don and his family by Dr. John Deel and Wendy and other staff in the open heart surgery recovery intensive critical care unit at CAMC Memorial during the last 12 days of his life.

Online condolences and memories may be shared at www.haferfuneralhome.net.

Hafer Funeral Home, 50 N. Pinch Road, Elkview, is assisting the family.

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Lynndal E. Harkins http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019997 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019997 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:02:22 -0500 Lynndal E. Harkins, 75, of Charleston, passed away unexpectedly Sunday, Dec. 28, 2014 at home.

He was born Aug. 24, 1939 to the late Samuel J. and Mabel Litton Harkins. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife of 44 years, Glenna Nida Harkins, and brother, Paul G. "Skip" Harkins.

Lynndal graduated from Charleston High School in 1957 and served in the U.S. Navy before returning to Charleston. Working full time and attending college at night, he graduated from Morris Harvey College in 1971 with degrees in both business administration and mathematics.

He retired from Dow Chemical in 2003 with over 37 years of service to the company and its predecessor, Union Carbide Corporation.

In retirement, Lynndal took his first dance lesson and became an avid dancer. With his fiancee, Becky Shelton Ellis, he danced several times weekly with the Extreme Country Dance Club, Goodtime Country Dancers, Kickin' Kountry Couples, Speak Easy Singles and at the Marmet Recreation Center.

Lynndal was a Mason, a member of the Scottish Rite and a member of the Sons of the American Revolution. He was a volunteer at Charleston Area Medical Center and actively participated in the Union Carbide Old Timers Club.

He is survived by fiancee, Becky Shelton Ellis of Charleston; children, David Harkins of Fort Mill, S.C., Kelli Barton and her companion, Tim Clemmons, Jane Ann Harmon and her husband, Harvey, and son Matt Harkins, all of Charleston; grandchildren, Katy, Suzy, Michael and Cary Harkins, and their mother, Tracy, of Fort Mill, S.C., Heather, Robert and Emily Barton of Charleston, Seth, Autumn and Noah White, and their father, Duane, of Franklin, N.C., Abigail Cooper of West Hamlin and Gaberiel Harkins of Charleston; great-grandchildren, Kya Isom and Aubrey Cooper; sisters, Carmen Ranson and her husband, Charles, of Goldtown, Phyllis "Connie" Barron of Charleston and Gwendolyn Cummings and her husband, Charles, of Bowling Green, Ky.; sister-in-law, Jane Miller and her husband, Ed, of Kenna; as well as many nieces and nephews.

Funeral service will be at 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 3, at Bartlett-Burdette-Cox Funeral Home, Charleston. Burial will follow at Tyler Mountain Memory Gardens, Cross Lanes.

Friends may visit with the family from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 2, at the funeral home.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests donations may be made in memory of Lynndal to the American Heart Association, the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation or a charity of your choice.

Bartlett Burdette Cox Funeral Home, 513 Tennessee Ave., Charleston, WV 25302, is serving the Harkins family.

Online condolences may be sent to the Harkins family by visiting www.bartlettburdettecox.com.

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Jewell J. Hill http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019990 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/OBIT/301019990 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:02:29 -0500 Jewell Hill, 84, of Richwood, went home to meet her Lord on Saturday, December 27, 2014. She was a member of Hinkle Mountain United Methodist Church for 44 years.

She was preceded in death by her loving husband, Paul Hill. They were married for 64 years and had six children. One daughter, Iris June Shaver Golden, also preceded her in death. She was preceded in death by her parents, Abraham and Jessie Sansom, and many brothers and sisters.

She was a homemaker, loving wife and mother. Friends and family, far and wide, loved her cooking and serving others made her happy. Gardening, canning, sewing and crocheting were a few of her passions. After Paul retired, he and Jewell spent 20 years camping and enjoying retirement with friends.

Surviving to cherish her memory are her daughter, Pauline Smith (Dennie), Rock Creek, Ohio; son, Herman Hill, Leet, WV; daughter, Vernondia Adams, Richwood; son, Paul (Nancy), Charleston, WV; and son, Ron (Naomi), Richwood. Also surviving are 12 grandchildren, Derrick Smith (Kim), Denise Smith, Stephanie Hill (Michael), Ashley Thompson (Justin), Donald Adams (Leeann), Cristy Hamilton (Sean), John Golden (Heather), Kala Golden, Summer Hill, Daniel Hill, Brian Hamrick and Crystal Nutter; 20 great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren; sisters, Gladys Thompson, Ruby Lawrence and Ruth Miller; and brother, Wondel Peyton.

A celebration of her life will be held at noon Saturday, Jan. 3, 2015 at Hinkle Mountain United Methodist Church. Visitation will be one hour prior to the service. Interment will follow at Mountain View Memorial Park Cemetery, across from the church.

Simons-Coleman Funeral Home, Richwood, is in charge of arrangements.

Condolences may be express to the family by emailing phill3400@gmail.com.

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For King & Country return to WinterJam as a different band http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/DM07/150109952 DM07 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/DM07/150109952 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 08:21:42 -0500 By Zack Harold Christian pop group For King & Country first came to Charleston as part of the line-up for WinterJam 2012.

It was their first tour as a band.

They will return this Saturday as a featured act of WinterJam 2015.

And, while the band still features brothers Joel and Luke Smallbone, it is not the same group that passed through town three years ago.

"We discovered a lot on that tour about ourselves, about live performance, just the beauty and camaraderie of the whole group on the road," Joel said. "It's written into our story as a band in a very deep way."

Before that first tour, Joel and Luke spent six years building their band before releasing their debut album "Crave."

During that time, they wrote more than 120 songs. They changed their name a few times, performing for a time as "Joel & Luke," and then "Austoville" before finally settling on "For King & Country."

They played showcases and saw deals fall through, before finally landing a contract with Warner Music Group.

"That was our college education," Joel said.

The work paid off when they finally released "Crave" in February 2012. It reached No. 2 on the iTunes Christian & Gospel albums chart, and hit No. 4 on Billboard's Christian Albums chart.

The album's release was only the beginning, however.

They embarked on a relentless touring schedule that took them across the United States and forced the brothers to spend innumerable hours in cramped quarters.

"Even to this day...we've spent more time with each other than anyone else in the world," Joel said.

Then, in addition to their musical success, their lives started to change in other ways.

Since the release of their first album, both brothers have gotten married. Luke and his wife now have a two year old son. And on top of all that, Luke also has battled a digestive disorder that, for a while, left him bedridden and unable to perform.

Joel said it was a much different experience when it came time to make their second album, "Run Wild. Live Free. Love Strong."

"It's one thing to make a record when you're not traveling and you're not married, you can stay up all night working on songs," he said.

Now, their time was filled with their obligations as touring musicians, their duties as husbands, Luke's responsibilities as a father, along with the problems caused by his illness.

They no longer had time to write 120 songs, so they drew on the skills they learned making the first album.

Joel still remembers a quote written on the wall of the studio where they recorded "Crave." It read, "Creativity and judgment are two functions that can't occur simultaneously."

That has become a motto of sorts for the brothers.

"That's what we find in songs. The moment you begin playing by the rules is the moment your creativity becomes confined," he said.

They have also learned to pour their life experiences into the lyrics.

Joel said the central theme of "Run Wild. Live Free. Love Strong." is triumph over hardship. This theme plays out in songs about the brothers' Christian faith, marriage and illness.

"When we're weak, we believe God is powerful. We've seen that first hand," he said. "The songs, by the grace of God, are strong. The heart is right, and the message is there."

The critics seem to agree. Earlier this year, their sophomore release received a Grammy nomination for "Best Contemporary Christian Music Album."

WinterJam 2015 will kick off its 47-city East Coast tour at the Charleston Civic Center this Saturday, featuring Skillet, Jeremy Camp, For King & Country, Francesca Battistelli, Building 429, Family Force 5, Newsong, Blanca, About a Mile and Veridia.

Tickets are $10. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show begins at 7 p.m.

Contact writer Zack Harold at 304-348-4830 or zack.harold@dailymailwv.com. Follow him on Twitter at www.twitter.com/ZackHarold.

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Teens' use of e-cigarettes has state health officials concerned http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/GZ01/150109962 GZ01 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/GZ01/150109962 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:01:00 -0500 By Samuel Speciale The safety of electronic cigarettes has been debated throughout their rise to popularity in the past five years, but reports of increased use among teens has public health officials once again warning Americans of the potential danger posed by the mostly unregulated devices.

While tobacco use has been in steady decline and teen smoking levels are at an all time low, electronic cigarettes have become a popular alternative.

The battery-operated devices deliver a vaporized and highly concentrated mixture of liquid nicotine, flavoring and various chemicals. While the devices can resemble traditional cigarettes in appearance and use, they do not contain tobacco and other carcinogenic additives.

Public health officials say e-cigarettes are just as harmful as their traditional counterparts, but users say they are safe, less harsh and an ideal aide to kick the tobacco habit.

"There's an increased awareness and use of these devices," said Bruce W. Adkins, director of tobacco prevention for the West Virginia Bureau of Public Health.

The increase in teen use and many adult smokers opting to use electronic cigarettes has health officials calling for an evaluation of the industry, which, despite efforts from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, has remained unregulated.

"There's all kinds of angst over whether these products are safe or not," Adkins said. "The fact is, we don't know much about them."

Adkins said the lack of standardization and regulation in how "vaping" liquids are mixed is a recipe for disaster.

"I'm surprised something hasn't happened yet," he said.

While the chemicals used in the vaping liquids - propylene glycol and vegetable glycerin - are generally used as food additives and have been deemed safe, Adkins is not convinced.

His main concern, though, is with the toxicity of liquid nicotine, which is extracted from tobacco leaves. Unlike tobacco leaves found in traditional cigarettes, though, liquid nicotine is highly concentrated and can be lethal if ingested.

Carissa McBurney, an outreach coordinator for the West Virginia Poison Center, said it wouldn't take much for a teen - or even and adult - to accidentally overdose.

"Any amount can be fatal," she said, adding that calls to the poison center related to electronic cigarettes have increased. In 2013, the center received three calls for electronic-cigarette poisoning. McBurney said that number increased to 44 in 2014.

"The rise in calls is definitely related to the increase in use," she said.

McBurney also said at least two people in the United States have died from ingesting e-cigarette fluid, and while that might be a small number, she said it does expose that there is a risk.

That's why the rise in teen use has health officials worried, McBurney said.

In a 2014 survey, National Institutes of Health researchers found that 9 percent of eighth-graders admitted to using an electronic cigarette in the previous month. While that doesn't necessarily mean those teens are using e-cigarettes on a regular basis, the findings suggest that awareness of the product has increased and that teens are more willing to try them.

The Bureau of Public Health conducts a similar survey every two years, the last of which came out in 2013. It found that fewer teens used tobacco products, but that e-cigarette use was becoming more popular.

"That's when we started seeing the interest in e-cigarettes here," Adkins said. "We found there was somewhat of an increase in knowledge in middle and high school students."

Adkins said he expects to see a rise in users when the bureau conducts another survey this spring.

"We'll be learning a lot more about them and their use in March," he said.

One health concern Adkins fears will become a reality is that e-cigarettes will get teens addicted to nicotine and that they can be used to experiment with drugs.

"Historically, tobacco or nicotine products have been classified as a gateway drug that kids usually graduate from," Adkins said. "The delivery devices have been and can be used for other drugs, as well."

While the NIH has released studies that support that claim, Michelle Smith, co-owner of a vaping lounge in South Charleston, doubts that e-cigarettes will get nonsmoking teens addicted to nicotine or onto drugs.

"Teens who will try vaping are the ones who would try smoking or they smoke already," Smith said. "I don't think teens who wouldn't smoke would use this to start."

While some teens have tried coming into her shop, Smith said, she supports West Virginia's ban on selling e-cigarettes to minors and that she doesn't allow them to even come into her store.

If that isn't deterrent enough, Smith said e-cigarette devices and the needed liquids can be an expensive investment up front, something she thinks will dissuade teens from using them.

While that might be the case for boutique devices sold in lounges like Smith's, cheaper electronic cigarettes can be purchased at gas stations, with some starter kits costing $30 or less. Devices in Smith's shop cost $50 to $100.

Adkins said there is evidence that teens are somehow getting the devices. While he doesn't have an official tally, Adkins said there has been an increase in e-cigarette confiscation in schools across the state.

"We get complaints coming in from teachers and parents who have concerns about that," he said.

McBurney said several teens have admitted using e-cigarettes during presentations she has given in schools.

Despite the growing popularity of electronic cigarettes, though, more West Virginia teens are not smoking. According to the state's most recent youth tobacco survey, 53 percent of teens have never smoked a cigarette, up from 26 percent in 2000. West Virginia still has one of the highest gteen smoking rates in the country, though.

Reach staff writer Samuel Speciale at sam.speciale@dailymailwv.com, 304-348-4886 or follow @wvschools on Twitter.

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Daily Mail: Ventline – Jan. 1, 2015 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/GZ01/150109964 GZ01 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/GZ01/150109964 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:01:00 -0500 I fail to see why Fox News, or any news show, for that matter, is relevant. The population of the United States is about 320 million, of which about 275 million are adults. Fox News has an average viewership of less than 1.5 million, so at any given time only 1 out of 185 adults is watching.

"God has no religion." - Mahatma Gandhi

Someone asked me if I noticed how gray the president's hair is since he has been in office. I answered no, but I've noticed how long his nose has grown. I wonder what it will look like when he leaves office.

I liked reading Stephen Reed's comments on welfare - this from a guy who lived entirely off of the taxpayers while being Democrat. Anytime you are deputy anything in government you are a ward of the state. Tell me one need for a deputy secretary of state. He was the office boy. And he loved living off of the state. But he is really funny in everything he writes. You just have him on the wrong page.

So far, President Obama has kept us safe. George W. Bush did not.

Give praise where praise is due. Congratulations to Marshall and Coach Doc for a winning season. I wish WVU had tried harder to keep him. Wishing him the best.

Thanks to neighborhood watch volunteers - the city, state and power company workers. We now have working streetlights on MacCorkle Avenue in Kanawha City, at long last. Happy holidays, everyone. May your season be bright(er).

I just love reading the funny right-wing comments. Keep them coming; I especially enjoy the misuse of the English language. I'm just surprised that they don't blame Obama for their lack of education.

Fox News was taken from Dish Network. Could it be Fox News may be ripping off Dish Network? Didn't CNN do the same thing to Dish? If, in fact, Fox was asking eight times more, then I will ditch Dish and Fox. Too many commercials on Fox News anyway.

The person saying state workers are incompetent needs to look at the particular person. Are they someone's relative? Those are the incompetent ones. The ones in "created" positions. There are many, many good state workers. Good hard workers. And believe me, we more than earn our money. Do you earn yours?

What has happened to the GOP "terror of the month" for November? Surely everyone remembers ISIS, they had Toyota pickup trucks, machine guns and black flags, and were a definite threat to us, except I never could figure out how they were going to get those pickup trucks over here.

I see where the GOP mayor of New York during Sept. 11 is blaming President Obama for the shootings of the two policemen in Brooklyn. I don't remember him blaming George W. Bush for the attacks on Sept. 11. Blaming Obama for everything has progressed to the point of ridiculousness, and would be funny if not so idiotic.

Received a letter from the National Park Foundation wanting a donation to help sustain their legacy. I will donate to the National Park Foundation when they start supporting the American workers. If you will notice, their products are foreign made. It just isn't right. If you visit, be sure to fill out a card and refuse to buy their products.

"If you don't like it, then move" has to be the most spiteful, least intelligent, short-sighted reaction to criticism there is. Efforts to make the state cleaner, more economically viable, and less hostile to people who aren't exactly like you could benefit you, too. Stop beating up on people who are trying to help.

The Charleston police officer, Shawn Williams, having trouble with the city of Charleston should tell them to take the job and shove it.

This time of year is the season for repentance and healing of old wounds. If you reach out to someone and they do not reciprocate, then you know you have done all you can do and you can tap the dust off of your sandals and move on with a clear conscience. Thank you.

The leftist progressives, also known as Democrats, are doing all possible to remove Christ from public discourse. While at the same time in certain areas in textbooks and government they allow their sympathy to Islamic teaching and Sharia Law to show.

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South Charleston readies for election http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/GZ01/150109965 GZ01 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/GZ01/150109965 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:01:00 -0500 By Matt Murphy Election season is gearing up for Kanawha County's second-largest city.

In a little over a week, residents in South Charleston will be eligible to file to run in the city election later this year.

Filing for the election will begin on Jan. 12 and end on Jan. 23. Candidate announcements and filings fees will be accepted by mail as long as they are postmarked by Jan. 24, City Clerk Margie Spence said.

South Charleston's primary election is Saturday, April 18, and the general election is Saturday, June 6.

All eight ward seats are up for grabs, as are races for mayor, municipal judge and city clerk.

For mayor, incumbent Frank Mullens, a Republican, has indicated he will run for re-election. Former mayor Richie Robb - now a Democrat - has also said he plans to run.

The current municipal judge is Wyatt Hanna, a Democrat.

Ward 1, which includes the Armor View and Rock Lake Village neighborhoods, is represented by Kent Rymer, a Republican.

Ward 2, which covers the Spring Hill neighborhood, is represented by Democrat Linda Anderson.

Across Kanawha Turnpike, Ward 3 covers the Southmoor neighborhood, Little Creek Park and the area around the Little Creek Golf Course. It is represented by Democrat Kathleen Walker.

Ward 4 includes the flat areas from Vine Street to Davis Creek and all of South Charleston's territory along Jefferson Road and Corridor G. It is currently represented by Democrat Jef Stevens.

Ward 5 generally includes all the area from Davis Creek to D Street between Kanawha Turnpike and the Kanawha River, plus some riverfront area in the vicinity of Interstate 64. Democrat Dayton Griffith represents that ward.

Ward 6 includes the hilly areas of South Charleston from the West Virginia Regional Technology Park to Montrose Drive. It is represented by Democrat Meg Britt.

Ward 7 runs from D Street to the eastern city line near the Patrick Street Bridge, plus some of the Montrose Drive neighborhood. It is represented by James Siebold III, a Democrat.

The final ward, Ward 8, covers the hilly neighborhoods in the southeast corner of the city. It is represented by Republican Jeff Means.

Filing fees in South Charleston are $150 for mayor, $100 for municipal judge, $75 for clerk and $25 for council seats.

City residents can also run for their party's executive committee at no charge.

Documents to enter the race are available at the city clerk's office. For more information, call the South Charleston City Hall at 304-744-5301.

A complete list of municipal election candidates, a ward map and election news is online at http://blogs.dailymailwv.com/cityhall/electioncenter2015.

Contact writer Matt Murphy at matt.murphy@dailymailwv.com or 304-348-4817. Follow him at www.twitter.com/DMLocalGov.

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Your vents for Thursday, Jan. 1 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/DM01/150109968 DM01 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/DM01/150109968 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:01:00 -0500 n I fail to see why Fox News, or any news show, for that matter, is relevant. The population of the United States is about 320 million, of which about 275 million are adults. Fox News has an average viewership of less than 1.5 million, so at any given time only 1 out of 185 adults is watching.

n "God has no religion." - Mahatma Gandhi

n Someone asked me if I noticed how gray the president's hair is since he has been in office. I answered no, but I've noticed how long his nose has grown. I wonder what it will look like when he leaves office.

n I liked reading Stephen Reed's comments on welfare - this from a guy who lived entirely off of the taxpayers while being Democrat. Anytime you are deputy anything in government you are a ward of the state. Tell me one need for a deputy secretary of state. He was the office boy. And he loved living off of the state. But he is really funny in everything he writes. You just have him on the wrong page.

n So far, President Obama has kept us safe. George W. Bush did not.

n Give praise where praise is due. Congratulations to Marshall and Coach Doc for a winning season. I wish WVU had tried harder to keep him. Wishing him the best.

n Thanks to neighborhood watch volunteers - the city, state and power company workers. We now have working streetlights on MacCorkle Avenue in Kanawha City, at long last.  Happy holidays, everyone. May your season be bright(er).

n I just love reading the funny right-wing comments. Keep them coming; I especially enjoy the misuse of the English language. I'm just surprised that they don't blame Obama for their lack of education.

n Fox News was taken from Dish Network. Could it be Fox News may be ripping off Dish Network? Didn't CNN do the same thing to Dish? If, in fact, Fox was asking eight times more, then I will ditch Dish and Fox. Too many commercials on Fox News anyway.

n The person saying state workers are incompetent needs to look at the particular person. Are they someone's relative? Those are the incompetent ones. The ones in "created" positions. There are many, many good state workers. Good hard workers. And believe me, we more than earn our money. Do you earn yours?

n What has happened to the GOP "terror of the month" for November? Surely everyone remembers ISIS, they had Toyota pickup trucks, machine guns and black flags, and were a definite threat to us, except I never could figure out how they were going to get those pickup trucks over here.

n I see where the GOP mayor of New York during 9/11 is blaming President Obama for the shootings of the two policemen in Brooklyn. I don't remember him blaming George W. Bush for the attacks on 9/11. Blaming Obama for everything has progressed to the point of ridiculousness, and would be funny if not so idiotic.

n Received a letter from the National Park Foundation wanting a donation to help sustain their legacy. I will donate to the National Park Foundation when they start supporting the American workers. If you will notice, their products are foreign made. It just isn't right. If you visit, be sure to fill out a card and refuse to buy their products.

n "If you don't like it, then move" has to be the most spiteful, least intelligent, short-sighted reaction to criticism there is. Efforts to make the state cleaner, more economically viable, and less hostile to people who aren't exactly like you could benefit you, too. Stop beating up on people who are trying to help.

n The Charleston police officer, Shawn Williams, having trouble with the city of Charleston should tell them to take the job and shove it.

n This time of year is the season for repentance and healing of old wounds. If you reach out to someone and they do not reciprocate, then you know you have done all you can do and you can tap the dust off of your sandals and move on with a clear conscience. Thank you.

n The leftist progressives, also known as Democrats, are doing all possible to remove Christ from public discourse. While at the same time in certain areas in textbooks and government they allow their sympathy to Islamic teaching and Sharia Law to show.

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Charles Walker Band makes music on a budget http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/GZ0601/150109969 GZ0601 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/GZ0601/150109969 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:01:00 -0500 By Bill Lynch The dream for a lot of performing musicians is to one day move past playing the bars in their hometown to playing clubs on the road. The truth is if you only ever play shows in your own neighborhood, you're probably never going to be more than a neighborhood band - especially if you're from someplace like West Virginia, or Wisconsin...

A few years ago, Milwaukee-based neo-funk outfit The Charles Walker Band loaded up its van and hit the road.

Walker, who returns to West Virginia for shows at The Empty Glass tonight and The V Club in Huntington on Saturday, said he's learned a lot since then about touring.

"The first thing is you have to know why you want to tour," he said.

Touring because you like to travel isn't a good enough reason. You'd be better off just taking a vacation.

Touring with a band is work. You have to plan.

"You have to know what areas you want to hit," he said. "You need to work out a route and stick to that route for a while, really work that route until you build up a fanbase."

Walker said you can't just hit five states one trip and then another five states the next time around. That doesn't give an audience the chance to know who you are.

"People need to see you a couple of times before they get it in their head that they're enjoying you," he said.

Making fans takes time, and it's not cheap.

"You have to accept that you're probably going to lose your butt the first few tours," he said. "It's almost inevitable."

This is particularly true, Walker said, if your band plays clubs where you get paid a percentage of the cover charge instead of a flat fee. Nobody knows you, so they might not come out.

You also have to be able to offer something different. Walker said even in Milwaukee, his band tries to be the only thing of its kind. But it didn't start out that way.

"When I put the band together 10 years ago, we were doing strictly blues," he said. "About two or three years in, when some of the musicians in the band changed out, we had some soul and R&B influences."

During the last five years, Walker said, the group has drifted towards funk and pop.

"It was definitely an evolution," he said. "But people come up to us in Milwaukee and say, 'Nobody is doing what you're doing.'"

Walker laughed and said, "That's always what you want to hear."

The band has recorded a few EPs. Its latest, "Ghetto Prophet," was released last April. The five-song sampler showcases the different styles of music the band plays, Walker said.

"We even do a cover of Cary Rae Jepson's song, 'Call Me Maybe,' but it's very different than the original."

Walker said his band keeps coming back to West Virginia not only because it's a good place to stop on the route, but because the response has been good. People keep coming to the shows.

"We've been coming to Charleston for a little over a year now," he said. "We honestly enjoy Charleston, and The Empty Glass is such a cool venue."

As far as the where the group is as a band, Walker said it's OK, but he and his bandmates are trying to work their way up to bigger shows, bigger tours and eventually some of the perks that come with big-time success, like more comfortable travel and more gracious accommodations.

"We travel in a 12-seat van," he said. "We cram all the gear in back, and everybody rides up front."

They do well enough to mostly stay in motels, but they usually share the same room. They're not complaining, he said.

"You've got to make the budget work."

Reach Bill Lynch at lynch@wvgazette.com, 304-348-5195 or follow @LostHwys on Twitter.

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Winer Jammin' with Jeremy Camp http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/GZ0601/150109970 GZ0601 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/GZ0601/150109970 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:01:00 -0500 By Bill Lynch Contemporary Christian singer/songwriter Jeremy Camp doesn't worry too much about outgrowing his audience.

The 36-year-old, who headlines Winter Jam Friday night at the Charleston Civic Center, doesn't feel like what he's doing is getting stale, even after almost 15 years of performing nationally.

"I think the biggest thing is people want authenticity," Camp said.

He always strives to expand and grow as a musician. Camp said with his upcoming record, "I Will Follow," he and his band certainly stretched out musically because they always want to connect and always want to have a fresh sound.

"Here's the deal," he said. "I'm really a minister of the gospel, who happens to play music. That's how it's always been."

The music can be almost anything. The message, however, is always the same.

Regardless of what music he plays, Camp stays true to his faith. He said he's excited to serve the Lord and spread the gospel.

Not everybody feels the same way.

"The spiritual climate right now in this country is very dull," Camp said.

Paradoxically, accessibility to Christian-themed things, he said, is very strong. Churches across the country offer a wide range of programs. There are more Christian conferences, concerts and teachings available than ever. 

"There's so much out there," he said. "But how much is led by the holy spirit? You can work hard and have all these programs, but if it's not being led by the spirit, there's going to be no effect."

The problem is ambition, Camp said, which can lead well-meaning people astray. It's something he said he's sometimes struggled with - trying to figure out whether he's doing what he does as service to himself or service to the Lord.

"I have to ask myself, 'Am I being led by the spirit or by my own ambitions?' I think that's what we have to be careful of in the church."

There are many strong churches and many strong people who seek to do good things, Camp asserted, but just doing good for the sake of doing good really isn't enough.

He also thinks more people could stand up for the word of God.

"God's word is being challenged these days as not relevant," Camp said. "And that's sad to me, because it is.

"We have to stand strong on that."

Camp said he isn't condemning anyone or pointing fingers, but he thinks that people need to read the word of God, and if they follow the ways of the word, they won't lose their way.

"Maybe you don't even know how you're doing spiritually," he said. "But when you start reading the word, you say, 'OK, Lord, I see.'"

Sometimes people just need a renewal, which is something Camp found last year.

"It was one of the best years of my life," he said.

Toward the beginning of 2014, Camp had fulfilled his end of his record deal, and things looked pretty good. The tour was over, and nothing was wrong either professionally or at home, but the singer wasn't sure what he was supposed to do next.

"So, of course, I went to the Lord," he said. "As you come to the end of something, you just want to make sure the Lord is leading you, directing your next step."

Camp said he prayed about it, asked for guidance.

The singer said, "[God] kind of said, 'I want you to go for it again.'"

That message arrived in the form of inspiration and energy, Camp explained.

"He started giving me these songs and such a renewed sense of clarity."

So, Camp signed with his record company again, recorded the new record (which will be released in February) and is ready to attack 2015 with new energy.

He can hardly wait.

Reach Bill Lynch

at lynch@wvgazette.com, 304-348-5195

or follow @LostHwys on Twitter.

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Editorial Cartoon for Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/DM04/150109972 DM04 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/DM04/150109972 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:01:00 -0500

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Another View: Road funding solution needed http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/DM04/150109973 DM04 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/DM04/150109973 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:01:00 -0500

Republished from the Wheeling Intelligencer/News Register, Dec. 29, 2014

WHEELING - Remember the "blue ribbon" commission Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin appointed to recommend solutions to West Virginia's highway funding dilemma? After many months of work it has resulted in ... nothing.

Meanwhile, Mountain State drivers continue to dodge crumbling pavement on hillsides, slam into pothole after pothole, worry about deteriorating bridges and do without new roads needed for economic development.

For years, experts have warned the state must devise a new method of funding road and bridge maintenance and constructing new highways. Fuel taxes that were the mainstay for generations no longer are adequate. Federal funding has been disappointing.

Earlier this year, a national nonprofit group, TRIP (not an acronym) reported that 33 percent of rural roads in the state are in poor condition. About 13 percent of the highway bridges are "deficient" - though not necessarily dangerous - according to the organization.

So, what else is new? That may have been the reaction of many West Virginians who don't need anyone to tell them highway and bridge maintenance has been lagging.

Don't blame the state Division of Highways. Officials and workers there do the best they can with limited funding.

Members of the governor's commission reviewed several options to increasing highway funding. Among them were higher gasoline taxes and tolls. Neither option would be popular.

But that is the challenge: The DOH needs more money - and it has to come from somewhere.

No doubt, that is why the commission simply seemed to fade away. No one in government wants to make the tough, politically unpopular decisions needed to bolster the DOH budget.

Someone has to do it, however - and without much more delay. Virtually everyone who travels West Virginia roads is aware of maintenance and repair projects that become more expensive the longer they are put off.

Early in the new year, then, Mountain State legislators should swallow hard and tackle the road funding issue.

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Editorial: Was the W.Va. Supreme Court's recusal system manipulated? http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/DM04/150109974 DM04 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150101/DM04/150109974 Thu, 1 Jan 2015 00:01:00 -0500 A recent report by ABC News calling West Virginia's highest legal tribunal "a circus masquerading as a court" has prompted much criticism of Chief Justice Robin Davis and her failure to recuse herself from a high-profile case.

But lost amid the talk of campaign contributions and private jets is another allegation that is in some ways more troubling.

Just days after winning a $90 million verdict in the notorious ManorCare nursing home case - a verdict that everyone knew would be appealed to the West Virginia Supreme Court - Michael Fuller, the Mississippi-based attorney for the plaintiffs, hired Paul Farrell, a partner at Justice Menis Ketchum's former law firm.

As is his custom when his former firm is involved in litigation before his court, Justice Ketchum recused himself from the case. A circuit judge, Alan Moats, was appointed to sit on the five-judge panel in Ketchum's place. Judge Moats, along with two other justices, joined Justice Robin Davis in upholding the lower court's verdict in part, resulting in a $17 million payday for Fuller.

The ABC report implies that Fuller hired Farrell for the purpose of removing Justice Ketchum from the case. Ketchum, according to ABC, had taken "a strong public position" in favor of a $500,000 cap on punitive damage awards.

Lawyers are notoriously bad at math, but you don't have to be a genius to discern that $500,000 is less than $90 million.

So if ABC's implication is correct, Fuller got a potentially unfriendly justice removed from the case by hiring Farrell.

As for Farrell, he and his partners took a cut of Fuller's $17 million in exchange for their involvement. Nice work, if you can get it. But of course you can't get it - unless you're a lawyer with close enough ties to a sitting justice that your involvement will force that justice to recuse himself.

To be clear, if anyone's conduct in the whole affair can be considered above reproach, it is that of Justice Ketchum. His decision to remove himself from the case was entirely proper.

It is the conduct of the lawyers involved, particularly Fuller, that should cause West Virginians to ask ourselves if our justice system was gamed.

The recusal mechanism is supposed to instill public confidence in the judicial system by ensuring that judges don't have personal stakes in the cases before them. Conduct like that alleged in this situation turns recusal on its head, making it a weapon in the hands of unscrupulous lawyers who would prefer that certain judges not hear their cases.

It may be legal, but nonetheless it appears to be a distasteful manipulation of our state's highest court.

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