www.wvgazette.com http://www.wvgazette.com Gazette archive feed en-us Copyright 2015, Charleston Newspapers, Charleston, WV Newspapers Funerals for: April 27, 2015 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT01/304279984 OBIT01 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT01/304279984 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:04:01 -0400 Cobb, Betty 1 p.m., Long and Fisher Funeral Home, Charleston.


Cornwell, Tiara 11 a.m., Gatens


Davis, Drewzella 1 p.m., Wilson Funeral Home, Charleston.


Dent, Margaret 1 p.m., Stevens and Grass Funeral Home, Malden.


Drennen, Reba 11 a.m., Chapman Funeral Home, Hurricane.


Fleshman, Mickey 6 p.m., Preston Funeral Home, Charleston.


Hedrick, Marlene 11 a.m., Bartlett


Hill, Lillian 2 p.m., Groves Funeral Home Chapel, Union.


Holmes, Clarence 2 p.m., Gatens


Kyle, Jack 11 a.m., Henson and Kitchen Mortuary, Huntington.


Phelps, Lynn 3 p.m., Bartlett


Phelps, Steven 1 p.m., Armstrong Funeral Home, Whitesville.


Wheeler, James V. 1:45 p.m., Donel C. Kinnard Memorial State Veterans Cemetery, Dunbar.

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Anna Meade Barton http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279999 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279999 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:02:32 -0400 Anna Meade Barton, 93, wife of Robert S. Barton for 30 years, died April 22, 2015 in Plano, Texas. She was the daughter of William Meade Lawson and Ethel Bivens Lawson.

She graduated from Thomas Jefferson Junior High and Charleston High, and then attended Morris Harvey College. In addition to the Kanawha County area, she also lived in Baytown, Texas, Spring Branch, Texas, Ashland, Ky., Richmond, Ky., and Dallas, Texas.

She was preceded in death by husband, Robert S. Barton, and sisters, Pete Kyle, Lucille Connell and Dorothy Grose. She was a member of the Methodist Church her entire life.

Anna is survived by her daughter, Ann Sparkman (William) of Plano, Texas; her son, Bobby Barton (Jojean) of Richmond, Ky.; granddaughter, Tracianne Sparkman of Plano, Texas; and grandson, Brian Barton of Gainesville, Fla.

Funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, April 29, at Wilson Funeral Home, 420 Lee St. W., Charleston, with the Rev. Frank Shomo officiating. Burial will follow in Graceland Memorial Park, South Charleston.

Visitation will be 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home.

The online guestbook may be accessed www.wilsonfuneralandcremations.com.

Wilson Funeral Home, Charleston, is serving the Barton family.

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Bonnie Lou Beller http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279995 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279995 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:03:31 -0400 Bonnie Lou Beller, 48, of Dorothy, died April 20, 2015. Service will be 1 p.m. Tuesday, April 28, at Clearfork Worship Center, White Oak, with visitation beginning two hours prior. Interment will follow in Pineview Cemetery, Orgas. Arrangements by Armstrong Funeral Home, Whitesville.

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Pauline Mae Brown http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279986 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279986 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:03:56 -0400 Mrs. Pauline Mae Brown, 99, of Beckley, died April 22, 2015. Service will be at noon Wednesday, April 29, at St. Paul Baptist Temple, Beckley, with visitation beginning one hour prior. Arrangements entrusted to Ritchie & Johnson Funeral Parlor, Beckley.

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Bonnie R. Canterbury http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279989 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279989 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:03:48 -0400 Bonnie Reva Canterbury, 88, of Clendenin, went home to be with the Lord on Sunday, April 26, 2015 at Clay Health Care Center, following a short illness.

She was the daughter of the late Ambrose and Bertha (Crihfield) Abbott. Bonnie was also preceded in death by her husband, Delbert Lee Canterbury; brothers, Augie, Walter, Otmer, Ralph, Wilbert, Gainel and Jadie Abbott; and sisters, Audrey Abbott, Orbia Drake, Reba Bird and Ada Ledsome.

Bonnie, a former member of the Rebekahs, attended Mount Welcome Church and Clendenin Church of the Nazarene.

Bonnie is survived by her sons, Charles Lee Canterbury and wife, Karin, Calvin James Canterbury and wife, Cathy, and Delbert Ray Canterbury and wife, Shirley, all of Clendenin; daughter, Iris Griffith and husband, Telmage, of Knoxville, Tenn.; sister, Relia McCune of Massillon, Ohio; eight grandchildren; and 15 great-grandchildren.

Bonnie's funeral service will be 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 28, at Matics Funeral Home, Clendenin, with Pastor Charles Larue officiating. Burial will be at Clendenin Memorial Gardens, Clendenin.

Her family will receive friends one hour prior to the service at the funeral home.

Condolences may be expressed online at www.maticsfuneralhome.com.

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Rachel V. Craddock http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279998 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279998 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:03:22 -0400 Rachel Virginia Craddock, 91, of Campbells Creek, went home to be with the Lord on Thursday, April 23, 2015 at East Side Medical Center, Snellville, Ga.

Rachel was born in Cinco on June 2, 1923 to the late William and Mary Stone Hackney. She was a graduate of DuPont High School and Morris Harvey College and received her master's degree from WVU in special education. She was a retired school teacher with the Kanawha County Board of Education, having taught at several different schools in Kanawha County, especially Mary Ingles Elementary and DuPont Junior High. She was a member of Alpha Delta Kappa teaching sorority.

She and her late husband, Lowell, were avid travelers. She was also a member of Spring Fork Missionary Baptist Church, where she sang in the choir and a member of the Ladies Circle. She also served as the treasurer for the West Virginia AFSCME Retirees' Union.

Preceding her in death were her husband, Lowell J. Craddock; three sons, Jerry Hicks, Danny and Ken Craddock; sisters, Nellie Blackburn, Ruby Ulbrich and Ruth Ulbrich; and brother, Gene Hackney.

Left to cherish her memory are a daughter, Jane (Gerry) Freeman of Lilburn, Ga.; grandsons, Ken (Kate) Craddock of South Charleston and Tim Craddock of Milton, Fla.; great-granddaughter, Adeline Craddock; and niece, Karen Taylor of Glendale, Ariz.

Funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, April 29, at Spring Fork Missionary Baptist Church, Campbells Creek, with Pastor Mike Long officiating. Entombment will follow at Montgomery Memorial Park, London.

A visitation with family and friends will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 28, at the church.

The online guestbook for Rachel Virginia Craddock can be accessed at www.stevensandgrass.com.

Stevens & Grass Funeral Home, Malden, is in charge of arrangements.

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Mary Ellen Fizer http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279990 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279990 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:03:46 -0400 Mary Ellen Fizer, 59, of Hurricane, died April 26, 2015. Service will be 11 a.m. Wednesday, April 29, at Chapman Funeral Home, Hurricane. Visitation will be 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 28, at the funeral home.

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Patricia Ann Lewis http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279988 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279988 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:03:51 -0400 Patricia Ann Lewis, 85, of Charleston, passed away, peacefully surrounded by her family and friends, on April 25, 2015 at Hubbard Hospice House. She was a graduate of Charleston High School and attended West Virginia Wesleyan College.

She was preceded in death by her parents, Albert C. and Hattie C. Higginbotham, and her husband of 46 years, Frank P. Lewis Jr.

She is survived by her sons, Frank P. Lewis III of South Charleston, Thomas R. Lewis (Teresa) of Hurricane and Robert Andrew Lewis of Charleston; grandchildren, Stephen (Ashley), Benjamin, Jaxson, Kyleigh, Ryan and Dylan; great-grandchildren, Landon and Parker; and many cousins from the Jones, Wertz, Bell and Dearien families who were very special in her life, as well as her past and present Fort Hill friends, with whom she shared many joyous memories.

She retired from the medical offices of Drs. Jackson and Byrd. She was past secretary of the Kanawha Valley Road Runners and a longtime aid station volunteer for the Charleston Distance Run.

The family would like to thank the staff at SweetBriar, the nursing staff at Thomas Memorial Hospital and Hubbard Hospice House.

Friends may call from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 28, at Bartlett–Burdette-Cox Funeral Home, Charleston.

Funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, April 29, at the funeral home. Burial will follow at Spring Hill Cemetery, Charleston.

The family requests donations be made to Hubbard Hospice House, in lieu of flowers.

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Melinda Dawn Lovejoy http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279993 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279993 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:03:37 -0400 Our precious daughter, Melinda Dawn Lovejoy, 42, of Elkridge, joined her savior on April 24, 2015 after a long health battle.

Her life began Aug. 9, 1972 in Montgomery, and she was the daughter of Robert and Sherry Lovejoy Sr. of Elkridge. She was preceded in death by her grandparents, William C. Burrows and Elizabeth Burrows Carson and Algie and Macel Lovejoy, and her step-grandfather, Kenneth Carson.

She graduated from Valley High School in Smithers, and Melinda worked at Hardee's in Marmet.

Surviving are her son, Cameron Lovejoy; parents, Robert and Sherry Lovejoy Sr.; siblings, Roger Burrows, Bobbie and her husband, David Ewing, Sherry Ballard and Robert and his wife, Terri Lovejoy; and many nieces and nephews.

Service will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, April 29, at O'Dell Funeral Home, Montgomery, with the Rev. Greg Francis officiating. Burial will follow in Montgomery Memorial Park, London.

Friends may call from 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home.

Expressions of sympathy can be sent at www.odellfuneralhome.com.

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Hilah Leah Sauls http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279996 OBIT http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/OBIT/304279996 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:03:28 -0400 Hilah Leah Sauls, 80, of Ripley, passed away April 25, 2015 at her home, surrounded by her family. She was born Dec. 22, 1934 in Jackson County, a daughter of the late Carmel and Gatha Lowe Payne. She was a cook in the Jackson County school system and a member of the Ladies Auxiliary at Jackson General Hospital. She was also a member at Grace Gospel Baptist Church.

She is survived by daughters, Sally Lou (David) Francis, Rhonda Leah Sauls, Kathy Carol (Mark) Riddle and Anna Marlene Sauls; brothers, Dayton "Ham" (Sue) Payne, Charles Robert (Kathryn) Payne, Gary (Martha) Payne and Jerry Payne; sisters, Nancy Carol (Byron) Ingram, Evelyn (Bill) Carson, Joyce (Larry) Arbogast and Deborah Sherwood; grandchildren, Joshua Fields, Matthew Francis, Christopher Starcher, Tony Riddle, Meghan Francis, Brooks Balser, Corey Sauls and Madison Riddle; and eight great-grandchildren.

In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Franklin Delano Sauls. She was also preceded in death by sister, Mary Cummings, and brother, William "Billy Mac" Payne.

Funeral service will be 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 28, at Waybright Funeral Home, Ripley, with Pastors Larry Arbogast and Jason Sparks officiating. Friends may call at the funeral home from 5 to 7 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made in Hilah's memory to Hospice.

The family would like to extend a special thanks to Amedisys and Hubbard Hospice House for their care during Hilah's illness.

Memories and condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.waybrightfuneralhome.com.

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Civil War ends with forgotten steamboat disaster http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/GZ01/150429322 GZ01 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/GZ01/150429322 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:53:50 -0400 By Claudia Lauer The Associated Press MARION, Ark. - What remains of the greatest maritime disaster in U.S. history lies buried beneath an Arkansas beanfield where the Mississippi River once ran.

A century-and-a-half later, residents of the nearest town and descendants of passengers aboard the steamboat Sultana are gathering to commemorate a disaster that was overshadowed by Abraham Lincoln's assassination.

Along Highway 55 entering Marion, Arkansas, a small banner welcomes the descendants arriving for Monday's anniversary. Workers are feverishly restoring a mural depicting the steamboat as they seek to give the disaster its place in history.

The Sultana blew up on April 27, 1865, about seven miles north of Memphis, Tennessee, claiming as many as 1,800 lives, according to historical estimates. The Titanic claimed fewer - 1,517 - when it sank 45 years later.

But the momentous events of April 1865 - Lincoln's death and Gen. Robert E. Lee's surrender among them - all but eclipsed the tragedy on the Mississippi.

That month, thousands of Union prisoners newly freed in the South were being sent back north on steamboats. The Sultana was carrying six times its capacity with almost 2,500 people, among them many emaciated, injured or sick Union veterans.

"The nation had just endured four long years of civil war, over 600,000 lives were lost and people were accustomed to reading about thousands of men dying in battles," said Jerry O. Potter, a Memphis lawyer who counts himself among a handful of Sultana experts.

At 2 a.m. on April 27, as the Sultana navigated a swollen Mississippi that was flooded to treetop height and about 4 miles wide, three of the steamer's boilers exploded, sending flames and passengers into the air.

Residents of the tiny towns that dotted the river lashed together logs to make rescue rafts. Marion Mayor Frank Fogelman said people on both sides of his great-grandfather's family were among those rescuers.

"My grandmother made reference to it in the family Bible," Fogelman said. "The way I understand it, they used the raft to remove people from the wreckage and put them up in the treetops and then came back for everyone once all the survivors were away from the wreckage and the fire."

Passengers who escaped the burning ship struggled in the dark, cold water. Hundreds died of hypothermia or drowned. Bodies were still being pulled from the riverbanks months later, while others were never recovered.

The wreckage is now buried about 30 feet beneath a field not far from Marion, inside the river's flood-control levees. The river has since run a new course and runs about a mile east of the spot.

It wasn't until last year that the state of Arkansas erected a bronze plaque at the edge of a parking to memorialize the tragedy. Those who know the Sultana's story are hoping Monday's anniversary events will help make the sinking more than just a footnote to the end of the Civil War.

When the memorial is over, the 12,000-person town plans to turn a temporary exhibit into a permanent Sultana museum. The exhibit includes documents, photos, a canoe-sized replica of the steamboat and a wall covered in white panels with the name of every soldier, civilian and crew member.

"We've had a few people see this list and find an ancestor," said Norman Vickers, a local historian. "We hope more people will come and look at it, and maybe find something."

Potter, who wrote "The Sultana Tragedy" in 1992, is still researching the stories of those involved.

He recalled one former soldier who failed to re-board the Sultana when it steamed from Memphis. The soldier paid a local man to ferry him out to the Sultana so he could continue on to Ohio. The ex-soldier died in the disaster, but his best friend survived to tell about that twist of fate.

Years later, sitting at a descendants' reunion, Potter was able to connect the two families.

"That has been the one of the most rewarding parts of this, being able to help descendants make that connection," he said.

"Because to me, the greatest tragedy of the Sultana is that history has forgotten these men."

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Civil War ends with forgotten steamboat disaster http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/GZ01/150429323 GZ01 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/GZ01/150429323 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:53:01 -0400 By Claudia Lauer The Associated Press MARION, Ark. - What remains of the greatest maritime disaster in U.S. history lies buried beneath an Arkansas beanfield where the Mississippi River once ran.

A century-and-a-half later, residents of the nearest town and descendants of passengers aboard the steamboat Sultana are gathering to commemorate a disaster that was overshadowed by Abraham Lincoln's assassination.

Along Highway 55 entering Marion, Arkansas, a small banner welcomes the descendants arriving for Monday's anniversary. Workers are feverishly restoring a mural depicting the steamboat as they seek to give the disaster its place in history.

The Sultana blew up on April 27, 1865, about seven miles north of Memphis, Tennessee, claiming as many as 1,800 lives, according to historical estimates. The Titanic claimed fewer - 1,517 - when it sank 45 years later.

But the momentous events of April 1865 - Lincoln's death and Gen. Robert E. Lee's surrender among them - all but eclipsed the tragedy on the Mississippi.

That month, thousands of Union prisoners newly freed in the South were being sent back north on steamboats. The Sultana was carrying six times its capacity with almost 2,500 people, among them many emaciated, injured or sick Union veterans.

"The nation had just endured four long years of civil war, over 600,000 lives were lost and people were accustomed to reading about thousands of men dying in battles," said Jerry O. Potter, a Memphis lawyer who counts himself among a handful of Sultana experts.

At 2 a.m. on April 27, as the Sultana navigated a swollen Mississippi that was flooded to treetop height and about 4 miles wide, three of the steamer's boilers exploded, sending flames and passengers into the air.

Residents of the tiny towns that dotted the river lashed together logs to make rescue rafts. Marion Mayor Frank Fogelman said people on both sides of his great-grandfather's family were among those rescuers.

"My grandmother made reference to it in the family Bible," Fogelman said. "The way I understand it, they used the raft to remove people from the wreckage and put them up in the treetops and then came back for everyone once all the survivors were away from the wreckage and the fire."

Passengers who escaped the burning ship struggled in the dark, cold water. Hundreds died of hypothermia or drowned. Bodies were still being pulled from the riverbanks months later, while others were never recovered.

The wreckage is now buried about 30 feet beneath a field not far from Marion, inside the river's flood-control levees. The river has since run a new course and runs about a mile east of the spot.

It wasn't until last year that the state of Arkansas erected a bronze plaque at the edge of a parking to memorialize the tragedy. Those who know the Sultana's story are hoping Monday's anniversary events will help make the sinking more than just a footnote to the end of the Civil War.

When the memorial is over, the 12,000-person town plans to turn a temporary exhibit into a permanent Sultana museum. The exhibit includes documents, photos, a canoe-sized replica of the steamboat and a wall covered in white panels with the name of every soldier, civilian and crew member.

"We've had a few people see this list and find an ancestor," said Norman Vickers, a local historian. "We hope more people will come and look at it, and maybe find something."

Potter, who wrote "The Sultana Tragedy" in 1992, is still researching the stories of those involved.

He recalled one former soldier who failed to re-board the Sultana when it steamed from Memphis. The soldier paid a local man to ferry him out to the Sultana so he could continue on to Ohio. The ex-soldier died in the disaster, but his best friend survived to tell about that twist of fate.

Years later, sitting at a descendants' reunion, Potter was able to connect the two families.

"That has been the one of the most rewarding parts of this, being able to help descendants make that connection," he said.

"Because to me, the greatest tragedy of the Sultana is that history has forgotten these men."

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Vent Line for April 27, 2015 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/DM04/150429329 DM04 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/DM04/150429329 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:01:00 -0400 n When the refs disagree with all the sports analysts, all of Twitter and every American watching the final games of the Men's NCAA basketball tournament, should that be called bad officiating or labeled for what it is: stupidity, bias or, worse yet, possibly criminal behavior?

n A reader said Iran released their hostages when Reagan was sworn in, as if they were afraid of him. Better do your research, check what the payback was for Iran, then you won't be so proud of the third-rate actor that was president then.

n Ronald Reagan, darling of the Right, sold arms to Iran for six years. Wonder how much that has affected the power swing in the Mideast? Can't blame that on Obama, or can they?

n Robb owes his success as mayor to Carbide. For 25 years anytime he needed something, help was a phone call away. As Carbide pulled out, Robb's success suffered. If elected, the odds of his being a productive mayor again are pretty slim. He doesn't have the character or temperament to do it on his own.

n Who are you to decide who should be allowed to participate in church services? Excuse me, but I think that is between the good Lord and the person wishing to participate in church services.

n I resent someone questioning the 2 percent pay raise Ron Duerring received. That really isn't good enough to try to hang on the best administrator in the state. But he understands since we are not able to give raises to all teachers/administrators. You better try to do the best you can to keep him because he is the best you are going to find.

n I am not judging anyone but wish to set something straight. God did not say "judge not, less you be judged." Please go to Matthew 7:1 in the Bible and you will see Jesus Christ said it.

n Someone said West Virginia, Kentucky, Alabama and Louisiana are poor states and until recently have been Democrat-led. Now they are Republican-led and are still poor. It appears the voters in those states traded a possum for a rat.

n Dunbar residents are paying higher sewage bills so that an employee can drive the company truck to the truck stop in Hurricane for breakfast.

n When you constantly inform others how educated you are by pointing out you have a degree or you graduated magna cum laude yada yada yada, you're not impressing anybody. Education is worthless if you don't have common sense.

n I agree with the caller. How do we get term limits for local offices on the ballot? I'm all for it. There are too many political homesteaders here in Charleston and in Kanawha County.

n To the obvious WVU fan who made the comment about Marshall being stuck with Doc Holliday and Mike Hamrick, they've turned the program around. That goofball you call a football coach hasn't done anything since they got in the Big 12. Oliver Luck wasn't much better. So back off.

n How can so many born-again Christians justify hating our president just because he is black? I'm afraid that on judgment day Jesus will say "Father, I know these people not." No one can love God and hate others.

n There is a woman who lives on the fifth floor of Lippert Terrace and allows her family and other people to run in and out of her apartment 24/7. She makes a lot of noise and keeps people from sleep and from hearing their televisions. What can be done to get these people out?

n I see already with Mr. Manchin you can tell who is kissing whose hind end. He is up there endorsing Mrs. "what difference does it make now." Maybe we can get rid of him in 2016 when he has no Obama to help him out.

n This is in response to the person who said that not wanting to make a cake for a gay couple is like not making one for someone who is sad or ugly. Being sad or ugly is not a sin. You can make something legal but you cannot make it moral. This nation is turning into Sodom and Gomorrah.

n What if a patient cannot find their way through the way finder that CAMC has? You can't navigate the system. You can't get information.

n Are there any Christian counselors in Kanawha County who offer free counseling?

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West Virginians must vote, and hold their leaders accountable http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/ARTICLE/150429337 ARTICLE http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/ARTICLE/150429337 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:01:00 -0400 Editor:

It's said that Nero fiddled as Rome burned. Our leaders torched West Virginia this last session, fiddling with legislation that catered to those with the cash that paid their way into office. And, year after year, this great state languishes in 50th place in nearly everything.

Proud, hardworking and honorable citizens of West Virginia live with an education system that ranks at or near the bottom. While our representatives in Charleston bob and weave for position, our children's and grandchildren's futures continue to lie at the bottom of Muck River. A very powerful expletive is deserved here.

Businesses today depend on educated and prepared workers. We hear the falsehood that our home state is inhospitable to commerce because of the tax structure and unfavorable litigious court system. The truth is that if we combined the work ethic of our people with a superior 21st century educational system, companies would beat a path to the "Almost Heaven" interstate sign.

There is no benefit in playing the usual recording of the blame game. There is more than enough to go around. But, the buck stops here at home.

The responsibility rests squarely on us, the people of the Mountain State. It's here that the passion for change has to begin. Yet, the Secretary of State's office says that two-thirds of West Virginia voters failed to cast a ballot in the 2014 general election. That is a number that denotes failure.

With a one-third turnout, it is very easy with a chunk of change to influence an election. Quick math shows that only 19 percent of West Virginia's registered voters decided our future. That number is not just a failure, it's a nightmare.

If there was real justice and true visionaries in the government, the southern coalfields would be home to our own Harvard University and streets paved with gold. Instead, we have elected candidates who watched while out-of-state companies stole our wealth and left us with raped mountains, high risks of cancer and depleted natural resources. We are better than this.

It's time to get mad as hell. It's time for a Mountaineer Revolution. It's time to revolt, register and vote. It's time to turn this thing around. Start the revolution today. Register to vote. Become involved in elections. Volunteer whatever time and money you have to elect candidates you believe in. And then hold them accountable to their community.

We have work to do and it's time to stop fiddling around.

John Knight

South Charleston

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Auto dealer's op-ed on Tesla contained much misinformation http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/ARTICLE/150429338 ARTICLE http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/ARTICLE/150429338 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:01:00 -0400

Editor:

I was glad to see that Mr. Chris Miller took a little time to tell us about our legislative process, Tesla Motors and the misinformation clouding the air (March 24). On second reading I have concluded there may be some misinformation clouding his opinion piece as well.

Mr. Miller informs us that Tesla vehicles are sold in West Virginia but he does not give us the names and places of the Tesla vendors. I would like to look at a couple of Tesla vehicles.

Then Mr. Miller tells us that Tesla "slithers around" and that he doesn't want that. I personally know at least one car dealer in Mercer County that tends to do some slithering and I, too, find it discomforting, but he doesn't sell Tesla vehicles. Mr. Miller does give Tesla credit for being able to waltz. I suppose that is more refined than either buck dancing or flat footing but I have never seen a car attempt to do either.

Mr. Miller goes to great length about the tax benefits that are enjoyed by Tesla and that Tesla is surviving on the taxpayer's dollar. Evidently Mr. Miller is either very young or has a very short memory. He does not seem to appreciate the role taxpayers played in the Lee Iacocca-Chrysler Corporation melt down. Thanks to the taxpayer's dollar, Chrysler and Jeep are still around. He does not even acknowledge what taxpayers had to do in the Bush economic fiasco that sent General Motors to the taxpayers and almost sent the total automotive industry to the trash dump.

In reality, Tesla is dong the world a great service, a service that will benefit every animal, including humans, that breathes. Tesla is developing an efficient alternative to the internal combustion engine. If our local used car dealers wanted to be of service, they would be recommending that government give all the help that Tesla needs. Breathing should take precedent over selling used cars with internal combustion engines.

Bill Morefield

Princeton

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Editorial cartoon for April 27, 2015 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/DM04/150429339 DM04 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/DM04/150429339 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:01:00 -0400 Editorial cartoon for April 27, 2015

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Editorial cartoon for April 27, 2015 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/DM04/150429340 DM04 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/DM04/150429340 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:01:00 -0400 Editorial cartoon for April 27, 2015

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Editorial: Lynch confirmation is a sign of restored functionality http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/DM04/150429344 DM04 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/DM04/150429344 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:01:00 -0400 After what seems like years of gridlock and dysfunction in Washington, it appears as though Congress may be back on track.

After five months, the Senate has confirmed Loretta Lynch as the nation's next attorney general. Her confirmation came, finally, after Democratic leadership in the House and Senate agreed to move forward on a human trafficking bill - supported by both Sens. Joe Manchin and Shelley Moore Capito - without damaging decades-old language regarding a ban on federal funding of abortion.

Elected leaders also passed an extension of the Children's Health Insurance Program, fixed the way Medicare reimburses doctors and moved a few budget resolutions.

It's about time. For far too long, Democratic leaders have held up important pieces of legislation. But the tide seems to be turning. Since Republicans took control of the Senate earlier this year, function has replaced dysfunction - for the most part - in our nation's capitol.

According to Karl Rove, who wrote an opinion piece for the Wall Street Journal last week, House Speaker John Boehner and new Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell are working together to restore order to their chambers. Members of Congress now are expected to read, debate and amend bills in the committee process rather than having those bills dropped from the top, Rove writes.

"Nancy Pelosi's philosophy of governing - 'we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it' - is dead," according to Rove.

Not only that, members of Congress are working longer hours and more days. According to the Bipartisan Policy Center, the House has had 24 percent more working days in this year's first quarter than the same period last year.

The Senate, meanwhile, has had 43 percent more working days. That means more votes. The Senate, so far, has considered 202 amendments, up from 134 in the same period last year. There were 15 more roll-call votes in the Senate on amendments to the Keystone Pipeline bill alone, Rove writes, which is more than the number of roll-call votes on amendments the chamber had in all of 2014.

"After years of dysfunction, the House and the Senate are finally acting as the Constitution prescribes," Rove wrote in the piece. "The process is ragged, sometimes ugly, rarely fast and never completely satisfactory. Congress may not become popular. But it as at least functioning and thus more likely to produce real answers to the country's challenges. After the Reid and Pelosi years, that ain't nothin'."

Let's hope Congress keeps this up and continues to disavow the tactics of the previous regime in an effort to pass meaningful legislation that moves the country forward.

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Editorial: Hubble Space Telescope tells of America's ability to be successful http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/DM04/150429345 DM04 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/DM04/150429345 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:01:00 -0400 NASA launched the Hubble Space Telescope into orbit 25 years ago -- April 24, 1990 -- aboard space shuttle Discovery.

Long-time news readers will recall that the telescope was initially labeled a $1.5 billion blunder after initial problems with its focusing mechanisms.

But an intense and courageous repair mission by the crew of space shuttle Endeavour in late 1993 brought the telescope's photos into focus, and since then, "Hubble has fundamentally changed our human understanding of our universe and our place in it," according to NASA administrator and former astronaut Charles Bolden.

Like the nation's Interstate highway system, the Marshall Plan that rebuilt Europe after World War II, the moon landing, and many other accomplishments, the United States can produce some amazing successes when it focuses its resources on accomplishing a goal.

Yet the question is, can the U.S. undertake and be successful at such a challenging endeavor today, as it faces a $17 trillion debt and growing entitlement programs that eat more of the federal government's discretionary spending budget every year?

A great nation does great things. But many will offer a reasonable argument that a country with a debt of $56,658 for every man, woman and child can ill afford more costly space research, or many other projects despite their great educational and research benefits.

The nation needs to continue to be on the cutting edge of science and research, but it can't do so with unchecked, out-of-control growth of government spending along with a Congress and regulatory branch that is willing to tax and regulate businesses to a level that chokes innovation and growth.

To continue to be a global leader that makes out-of-this word discoveries, the U.S. must cap the growth in government spending, root out waste, duplication and obsolete programs, control the burgeoning welfare state, reform Social Security retirement and disability programs, and move it's health care system away from more government control to patient-centered and market based.

With better control of its debt, steady revenue growth based on an economy that rewards innovation, the United States could focus its resources on future grand accomplishments like the Hubble Space Telescope.

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Bulletin Board: April 27, 2015 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/GZ01/150429349 GZ01 http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150427/GZ01/150429349 Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:01:00 -0400 Coin club

St. Albans Coin Club will hold their monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. today in the basement of the St. Albans Municipal Building, 1499 MacCorkle Ave. For information, call 304-727-4062.

Vendors needed

The Tyler Mountain Volunteer Fire Department will host a vendor show from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the Cross Lanes Community Building, 5380 Big Tyler Road, Cross Lanes, adjacent to the fire station. Representatives of companies, such as Mary Kay, Tupperware, Pampered Chef, etc., are encouraged to come and display their products. Photographers and wedding planners are also encouraged to come. Tables are $15 each. To reserve a table, call 304-951-0581. Electricity is available, but limited.

Hike of the month

Greater Huntington Park and Recreation will sponsor the Hike of the Month at noon Saturday at Ritter Park. The hike is about 2 miles. Meet at the Ritter Park Tennis Center. For information, contact Stacey Leep at sleep@ghprd.org or 304-696-5954.

Open house

The Institute Volunteer Fire Department will hold an open house from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 16 at their location, 301 Dubois St. A hot dog and rummage sale will also be held. Tables are available for rental for $10 on a first-come, first-served basis. Call Brian Craft at 304-982-0368 to reserve a table.

Armed Forces parade

The 56th annual Armed Forces Day Parade in South Charleston has been scheduled for noon on May 16. Anyone who would like to participate can call Mary or Beth at 304-746-5552.

Items for Bulletin Board may be submitted by mail to The Charleston Gazette, 1001 Virginia St. E., Charleston, WV 25301; faxed to 304-348-1233; or emailed to gazette@wvgazette.com. Notices will be run one time free. Please include a contact person's name and a daytime telephone number.

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